Made Up Words, the #Language of a #Fiction #Novel

Creative Terms for Fiction

How great are the inventive words used to describe a new thing, event, or action in fiction? There are tons of examples.  Here are a few of my favorites:

  • An animagus is a person who can morph into an animal – from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.
  • Similarly, a warg is a person who can enter the minds of animals – from George R.R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones series.
  • The reaping is an event when a boy and a girl are chosen from each district to participate in the Hunger Games – from Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games series.
  • Buggers are insect-like aliens – from Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game series
  • A mudblood is a magical person born to non-magical parents – from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.
  • A half-blood is a person born from one parent who is a mythological god and one who is not – from Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson series.
  • Quidditch is a professional sport in the wizarding world – from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.

How do you invent a new term?

For my new series, (after)life lessons, I tried to be thoughtful about new terms. You can’t rename everything or your reader will get lost.  However, it is fun to imagine your new term catching on and being used in casual conversation!

My series is based on the premise that spirits exist in our world and certain people have the ability to see them.  Simply put, some people are spirit-seers and called visumaries, while others who can not see spirits are ableptic.

Visumary and Ableptic Definitions

Why do you choose the terms?

Sometimes authors choose the word because of the phonetic appeal – it sounds similar to another word that conveys a certain meaning. Other authors perform deep research on Latin roots or Greek mythology.

I felt the word visumary sounded similar to visionary, like they have the ability to see things others can’t.

Ableptic has a harsher sound – “bleh.” It is less musical, similar to J.K. Rowling’s choice of squib for a person born into a magical family, but has no magical abilities. Also, in English, “ablepsia” means lack of sight or blindness.

Kindle Scout Campaign Update

The Light of Supremazia Kindle Scout campaign has been trending *HOT* for 41 hours and has 692 page views!

Vote Here: The Light of Supremazia Kindle Scout Page

Twitter-Sized Bites

How do you invent new terms for a #fiction #novel ? Author @alanasiegel has some thoughts (Click to tweet)

What are your favorite #fictional terms – #quidditch #halfblood #warg ? Writer @alanasiegel has a few (Click to tweet)

Advertisements

Harry Potter at the 2014 Sochi Olympic Opening Ceremony

Either my brain is hardwired to relate everything in life to Harry Potter, or the world of magic is real. I vote for the latter.

 

Maybe wizards will reveal themselves to the global population like vampires in the True Blood series. A girl can dream.

…or maybe that’s a terrific idea for a new book series.

 

Anyway, did you pick out these similarities?  Looks like Spain’s Olympians thought the first event was quidditch.

Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony

 

Or how about the Hogwarts Express?  I bet it was headed for Platform nine and three quarters.

train

 

Did you catch the thestrals?  Maybe you didn’t see them because you didn’t witness death.

3 horses

 

One of these days, you’ll be picking out creatures and costumes from (after)life lessons.  My new book series, coming soon!

Think it’s difficult to get into Harvard? Try Vita Post Mortem Academy, where John F. Kennedy teaches social studies and Albert Einstein gives physics lectures. Of course, there’s no hope getting in if you can’t see ghosts. …not a problem for Juliandra Winklevoss.